Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Putting it Out There

I heard about this guy tonight from a friend in the School of Education. He's a cell phone salesman and went on Britain's version of American Idol: Britain's got Talent" with Simon Cowell as a judge. There is something really special about this clip . . . the guy isn't much to look at and he's under a lot of pressure on the world's stage.

He starts singing, and the beautiful girl in the middle starts to look at him a different way. The audience applauds at the first sound of his voice--a bit of a thrill right there. He hits the high note in the aria and the beautiful judge in the middle is visibly moved . . . the audience goes crazy with applause . . .

It's the power of great music, a great voice, and an intersection of opportunity and talent. It gives me hope for true art and pride in great music.

Do you think it is as special as I do?

NY Times article on the video, the event, and the singer here.

7 comments:

manprano said...

No. Quite frankly, I don't think it's that special, because he's singing music that is inappropriate for him. Anyone who knows anything about the operatic repertoire knows that this voice would never be heard in an opera house singing this role over a Puccini Orchestra producing the way that he's producing. He looks a little like someone with a disability, so he has sympathy, which is, in my opinion, very different from artistic admiration. The diction is terrible, he has a wobble that is not appropriate for someone his age, and the "vincerĂ²" is clearly under supported.

That said, he is committed to what he's doing, and for that and that only I applaud him. It's just not enough.

It does, however, say something very serious about our society and the state of art at the beginning of the 21st century that the sound of a voice like this--in the midst of all the stupidity that passes for singing right now---can make an audience stop.

Katie Elizabeth said...

I saw this a while back in a community on livejournal... and, it really is amazing. I got chill-bumps! What gets me is the talent and passion that is hiding out there in the world in regular people... cell-phone salesmen. It kind of makes me sad...

Anonymous said...

The "girl" you describe as beautiful is actually a woman in her mid- to late 30s who's already getting botox injections for facial wrinkles. Would you call a 30-something male a "boy"? Just curious!

Philip L. Copeland said...

Anonymous,

I used "girl" to suggest a different sex from the "boy" on her right and the "boy" on her left.

If you have a problem with me calling her beautiful, then you have a problem. She's beautiful.

Anonymous said...

You are right Dr. Copeland. She is beautiful and the whole story is touching. I loved it. Thank you!

J hood

Chris R. said...

Manprano, you say his diction may be terrible and he has a wobble and all that other negative stuff, and while that may be true, you have to remember he's untrained. His voice is still quite strong, and with some training, he could be magnificent.

Remember, Pavarotti wasn't born able to sing those high notes he's famous for. He had to work and train to get where he got to. Every singer, and for some of todays musician that word is used quite loosely, has to train and work on their technique, range, intonation, etc. So instead of tearing down this man who sang a not so perfect aria in front of hundreds of people, try and remember what you sounded like the first time you sang in front of a large group of people by yourself. I bet it wasn't perfect either.

I believe that with some training, this man will go a long way. I look forward to following his career.

Dr. Copeland, I apologize if I have overstepped by boundaries with this post.

Anonymous said...

i just find it funny they end off the clip with aerosmith....

~Sadie